gregbo (gregbo) wrote,
gregbo
gregbo

Yesterday I met with a career coach who is affiliated with Right
Management but not employed by them. (She has her own business.) We
had a talk about how a career coach might help me in my job search.
She generally felt that my introversion might be one of the things
that is making it difficult for me to get a job. That could be true
-- there are some times when in conversations, I tend to mostly
listen, and provide simple, short answers. However, I think I was
more open in my recent interviews. At today's meeting, I was feeling
low body energy, because I woke up without feeling rested and the
feeling persisted throughout the day. She also suggested that I use
the remaining meetings with coaches to practice some role-playing,
which I thought was a good idea anyway.

I don't think I'll be signing up with the coach after my program
ends. She's pretty expensive ($150/hr). Also, I still think I should
continue to spend most of my time trying to bring my skills
up-to-date.

Speaking of which, during the past couple of days I have been
reviewing transforms (z- and Laplace). There is a method that is used
to invert the transforms that requires taking derivatives and
evaluating them at certain values. Before I took the intro queueing
theory class (CS112) at UCLA, I used partial fraction expansion to get
the transforms into expressions that are more easily inverted. There
is another way to do this involving residues that I knew about from
6.003. It wasn't covered in the lectures or recitations but was used
on a videotape of a final exam review. It is also in the queueing
theory textbook, but I don't remember using it. At any rate, I had to
stop and think about how to do partial fraction expansion before doing
it. I made some mistakes in some of the problems I was working on,
but fortunately I caught them as I was checking my work. (It has
probably been at least twelve years since I've done anything like
this.)

I remember in the analysis of algorithms class (CS280A), which I took
at the same time I took CS112, the professor assigned a difference
equation problem. Because I had not learned the derivative method
yet, I used partial fraction expansion to solve it. It took a fairly
long time because it required solving a system of four equations in
four unknowns. However, I was glad that I was able to do that because
I had another way of solving the problem. We were never tested on
that, however.
Subscribe
  • Post a new comment

    Error

    default userpic

    Your reply will be screened

    Your IP address will be recorded 

    When you submit the form an invisible reCAPTCHA check will be performed.
    You must follow the Privacy Policy and Google Terms of use.
  • 0 comments