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web analytics blogs

I've been very busy the last couple of days looking for technical information/discussion about web analytics, especially if it includes click fraud. I eventually found a few sites, such as Got Ads? and John Battelle's Searchblog. They led me to another site I found really interesting, Joe Beda's EightyPercent.net. Joe Beda is a Google employee who writes about Google culture, including the 20% of his time spent on pet projects.

Here's the last paragraph from that page:

The intrapersonal environment at Google is very energizing. When someone comes up with a new idea, the most common response is excitement and a brainstorming session. Politics and who owns what area rarely enter into it. I don't think that I've seen anyone really raise their voice and get into a huge knockdown drag out fight since coming to Google.

I found it particularly interesting for a couple of reasons. One is that this aspect of peer-level interaction with other engineers was something I really missed at AV, because it had been a key aspect of most other places I'd worked. (I hope none of my AV friends take this the wrong way. Context: for a large part of my time at AV, I reported into a business intelligence management chain, rather than an engineering chain. Even after I was back in ops (granted, it was business ops engineering), there often wasn't time to brainstorm. Things just had to be done the quickest way possible with the lowest impact to other projects and/or people.)

The other, in light of the current click fraud problem, has to do with how Google decided to enter the PPC business. Who first proposed the idea? Why did they think it was a good idea? Was there any opposition? If so, from who? What arguments did the opponents make? Who made the final call, and what was their justification?

I am very tired and need to go to bed. I hope I can get some sleep. I woke up at 5am yesterday and couldn't go back to sleep. This used to happen a lot while I was working.

Comments

( 1 comment — Leave a comment )
gconnor
Apr. 10th, 2005 05:32 pm (UTC)
Context: for a large part of my time at AV, I reported into a business intelligence management chain, rather than an engineering chain. Even after I was back in ops (granted, it was business ops engineering), there often wasn't time to brainstorm. Things just had to be done the quickest way possible with the lowest impact to other projects and/or people.)

I would totally agree, much of my experience at AV was the same way. I got the feeling that the R&D folks were also that way -- mostly driven by a survival mode and not really "free thinking" or brainstorming. There was also a lot of protectiveness or guardedness when people talked about things, it seemed to be the rule and open sharing was an exception.
( 1 comment — Leave a comment )

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